Blog 2 Columns

Welcome to edcMerchants

Hello, welcome to edcmerchants, a web page dedicated to an exploration in human cooperation for the greater good of humanity. Our goal at edcmerchants is to offer high quality products, exceptional services and current information that will make a difference in your life. With the corona virus pandemic phenomenon we want to give all citizens of the world the opportunity to shop on line. We are very new and very small but hope to grow to meet the needs of home shoppers.  

This web site is work in progress. I have found enormous, inspiration and insight surfing the net since June of 1997 when I created this page. There are so many websites on the web that I want to be your number 1 go to web site.

I believe the internet is a physical, or at least a metaphorical, manifestation of Carl G. Jung’s collective unconscious. Which includes all the good and unfortunately the not so good of humanity’s conscious and unconscious thought, values, behavior and spiritual awareness. We must discern the difference as we explore the internet and stay true to our creative source which supports and encourages our life.

Human cooperation will be sustained when the bridge between traditional, conventional thinking and progressive thinking is strengthened. This bridge melding includes practices regarding corporate integrity, individual healing, community and economic development, spirituality and education. We are all humans on this earth. We each have individual needs and differing approaches to meeting those needs. Failing to work through our diverse views in a collaborative and peaceful way has destroyed community living. There seems to be a prejudicial gap among various groups that is keeping our communities from seeking this collaboration. In spite what some think these differing groups are not mutually exclusive. This is not an either or, black or white, kind of debate or discussion. Every individual has their own perspective. Promoting and expanding our differences causes more conflict and discord. We certainly must understand and respect our differences. But that is where it should end. We should pay attention to the concepts that bring us together. This page promotes a collaborative mission encouraging a democratic and ecumenical tolerance for people with different cultural, community, economic, religious and personal values. It supports and embraces all the common core values of being human.

Some of the common core values that we all strive for include an individual vision to live a peaceful and secure life filled with human cooperation, love and joy and gratitude. Gratitude for what we have and are able to give to others.

Another important part of living on earth is economic opportunity, people all over the world must have a reasonable way to make a living in the community they live. The source of this economic opportunity must be ethical and transparent. It must maintain human dignity. Only then will it sustain the individual, the community and the world.

We each must feel secure physically, economically, emotionally and spiritually. A significant part of this philosophy is that individuals take personal responsibility for the development of our local communities, workplaces and themselves. Working in your local community is a great start. Volunteer in your local community or place of work to make it a better place.

A great example of world cooperation, Catholic Relief Services will connect you to worldwide missions to assist many.. Another site is KIVA: Loans that Change Lives where individuals can invest in small businesses around the world.

Many individuals are also actively seeking individual healing and sustained health through various self-directed activities such as prayer, meditation, good nutrition, lifelong learning, and regular exercise including stretching and deep breathing. The work of Andrew Weil and Bruce Lipton are good examples of personal health approaches that include a paradigm shift, which will help evolve health care and medical practice for the foreseeable future. I also have experienced wonderful benefits from centering prayer, it promotes an internal spiritual sustenance by triggering the relaxation response, adding an conscious intention and encouraging you to “just be” with your creator in silence and all that entails. This sacred time which represents the Alpha and Omega is unlike linear historical time. In that silence your intention to be with your creator becomes timeless.
We must teach our children this gift. Learning to quiet ourselves in combination with taking action in our lives to become the best version of our self It starts with sound educational policies. Organizations that promote and attend to the needs of children are critical for the future of our world. It continues with local, state and national governments and in the work place.

We all want thriving workplaces, vibrant communities, and personal contentment. When all individuals and communities are thriving through cooperative efforts, we will each have found inner peace, and then will we truly be a healthy planet as the The Earth Charter envisions.

This is a worthwhile global goal for humanity. This page is dedicated to promoting human cooperation in daily community living and in the work environment. Promoting individual and global sustainability
Thanks for visiting my web page.

Keep the Faith

WE are the People Makers
WE frown they hide their heads, We smile they come alive
WE hurl belief at them
and,… they succeed

“Take care of yourself by caring for humanity”

Stephen

Copyright (C) 1997 – 2020 edcmerchants.com a division of edc Holdings LLC
Permission is granted for academic use of this material if cited appropriately.

The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.
Mohandas Gandhi

Can we be Too Hard on Ourselves?

It is sometimes hard to admit it but I fight with myself daily. Internally that is. LOL…. At first you may have imagined me throwing myself down and swinging like Joe Frazier or Mohamed Ali, beating myself into submission, but that certainly that is not what I am talking about, although my emotional turmoil seems at times just as painful as a boxer at the end of 10 gruesome rounds. What I am talking about is trying to do the right thing, giving the benefit of the doubt in all situations, in spite of my bias or preconceived notions.

I suspect some of the more sophisticated thinkers in the political correct world might have you think they are inclusive, have NO prejudice and are never bias toward any one at all. But, I do not believe it. They just have a better sense of politeness and possibly a much better filtering skill. I am losing my filtering skill. I am tired of filtering everything for fear of hurting someone’s feelings. Is that terrible? Yes, my mother would say. I really miss my mother. She is the one person who loved me unconditionally no matter what I did. She would tell me to stop beating myself up, forgive my self and keep trying to be the best-version-of-myself. Onward.

Know Thyself

This comment by Thomas Merton is so true.

“The reason why so many religious people believe they cannot meditate is that they think meditation consists in having religious emotions, thoughts, or affections of which one is, oneself, acutely aware. As soon as they start to meditate, they begin to look into the psychological conscience to find out if they are experiencing anything worthwhile. They find little or nothing. They either strain themselves to produce some interior experience, or else they give up in disgust.”

—Thomas Merton, No Man Is an Island

Sit in Silence, breath, release, Let Go Let God…Kyrie Elieson.

Patience in Serving God

The Maronite Church is the foundation of my life. My service as a Subdeacon has brought me back to my childhood awe of our Creator. When I let myself view God and Jesus as I did when I was a child, tears of joy rise in me that go beyond explanation to a unwavering faith in Jesus Christ as the bridge to both a joyful life on earth and everlasting life with God.

When I was a little boy I remember singing the song, “Jesus Loves the Little Children” in Sunday school. This song still comes to me often when I see a child playing or laughing, or when I hear of a miracle that clearly seems to be the work of the Holy Spirit. If I were a child, Jesus would surely love me. But does he love me as an adult? Most of the time I believe he does, but the daily challenges of living and working in the world sometimes diminish that belief. I lose hope for a moment here and there. But then I see a small child laugh or a baby in a mother’s arms and I am reminded of my faith. It then becomes much clearer to me what we all need to do to support our faith…become and stay like children in our unfailing wondrous belief in the salvation of Jesus Christ. That seems easy if we can remember the awe of belief and faith we had as children in all things wondrous; Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny, Superman, Mighty Mouse and the Lone Ranger. Heroes who made us happy children, bringing joy and saving people, just like Jesus who saved each of us who believe in Him. Now I am sure some will want to be a critic of my comparison of cartoon characters with Jesus. If you thought that, you’re missing my point. I am talking about the awe of belief in something, and when that something is the Most Holy Trinity, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, we are transformed. The children’s song is a wonderful reminder of God’s love for each of us as adults who must be like innocent children in our worship. Here are the words again.

Jesus loves the little children
All the children of the world
Red, brown, yellow, black and white
They are precious in His sight.
Jesus loves the little children of the world.

Seems to me this is a pretty solid and unambiguous message. Believe in God and his Kingdom as a child does and you will enter the Kingdom of Heaven. Another example of this is the scripture passage from Matthew 18:2-3 “2 And He called a child to Himself and set him before them, 3and said, “Truly I say to you, unless you are converted and become like children, you will not enter the kingdom of heaven.”

All of this and much more contributed to my discernment to answer God’s calling to serve the Maronite Church as a lector, cantor and subdeacon. My favorite part of this role is participating in silent prayer and adoration of the Eucharistic celebration and during the consecration which is said in Aramaic. I love chanting the Fetgomo, I love the prayers of the Syriac Antiochene Maronite Liturgy. When I participate with the mindset of a child, I am awed every time and filled with the Love of Jesus.

My biggest challenge in this ministry is keeping the balance between my love, dedication and need to provide financially for my family and staying humble and discerning in my role as a servant of God. I think the ego can promote pride and the false self which is contrary to the Divine plan for disciples of Jesus Christ. We are told the world has temptations; people will take advantage of you if they can. If you focus on this fear, it becomes your operating mindset. If I set up a competition between my work needs, my family’s needs and the Church’s needs, it will become a lose/lose situation. The challenge is to stay with the love of a child, but discern with the help of the Holy Spirit each meet and greet choice, the events and the people in your home and work life. When we welcome these challenges with the awe of a child, discern God’s will and give each one to the Holy Spirit with faith, daily life will be blessed and human connections will thrive and sustain with simplicity living in the Presence of the Lord . It is not always easy, but the path is clear.
Another challenge is maintaining the wisdom and simplicity of patience. The patience of waiting for the Coming of the LORD in our spiritual development, the patience of Job as we continue our daily work of earning a living, strengthening our family relationships and serving God; and, most important of all sustaining patience with our own imperfection as sinners. I find I am much harder on myself than almost anyone. I need to develop patience, surrendering my life to His will, while He creates that wonderful and beautiful sculpture from the block of my present self, knowing I will someday get to a place of peace and simplicity living God’s will. I wrote this poem many years ago and it seems appropriate for this article’s theme. It is called

Patience.
Patience is a funny thing,
That’s not inside of me.
I wonder how, and why and when,
Patience will come to me.
I hope it’s soon for it’s getting late,
I really am afraid.
For if I don’t get it soon,
I just will have to wait.
When I was child, Jesus was my Hero. He still is. But as I grow in my spiritual strength and faith He has become so much more than that. Jesus Christ manifested in the Most Holy Trinity, is my Friend, my Lord and my Savior, and to quote a wonderful Maronite Priest; Fr. Joe Thomas, our Trinitarian God is “my sickle in the thicket” May God grant me the patience to live my life according to His will.

Sing Your Song

Every person is a song. Each person shares their song in body language, dress, behavior, spoken words and actions. Human songs are in different keys some in tune with many others, in contrast with major keys or minor keys. Standards in music are clear. We like this song don’t like that song. It is in tune with perfect pitch or not.  However when a song is terrible or we don’t like it the first thing we must do is turn it off, or, we try and understand the source of that song.  Additionally, the human singing that song must understand that their song may out of key then some may not understand them. And in fact may not want them around. We each must evaluate our own song and decide whether we wanted to be with people or be independent and an expression of our difference. If we take that particular stand then there will be people who don’t like our individual difference. If we worry about if people like us, or agree with us or are in tune with us then we will fail. If we focus on serving others and sharing our passion we will make a impact. If your song is wonderful, people will want to tune into you. If your source is the objective reality, people will be moved to sing with you. If not… that is the beauty of life.

Seeking God can be a vain glory trap!

I converted to Maronite Catholicism over 40 years ago. In my early years I was excited and enthusiastic about learning about Eastern Christianity, my prayer and learning. I transformed my faith and started thinking like an Eastern Catholic, rather then just following the Catholic teaching. When you see the truth of Jesus Christ and live the truth of Jesus Christ your every moment becomes a choice between consciously moving closer to the Divine Grace you have been granted or sliding toward death and destruction. There is no gray area. You may get stuck, frozen or confused and not make a conscious choice (or you fool yourself thinking you have) but eventually you move, make a choice and head in a direction.

But your knowledge can be a trap. You can begin to think very highly of yourself given your dedication to living a Christian life. You become so smart in your subjective rationalization that you ate flying high. My spiritual director calls it idiosyncratic intelligent curiosity. I think it may just be vain/glory. Vain/glory can draw you into complacency. Be wise. Avoid this spiritual danger.

Avoid this spiritual danger when pursuing knowledge of God

Know thyself

https://www.facebook.com/groups/thomasmertonpropheticwitness/permalink/628138910964102/ .

This comment by Thomas Merton is so true.

“The reason why so many religious people believe they cannot meditate is that they think meditation consists in having religious emotions, thoughts, or affections of which one is, oneself, acutely aware. As soon as they start to meditate, they begin to look into the psychological conscience to find out if they are experiencing anything worthwhile. They find little or nothing. They either strain themselves to produce some interior experience, or else they give up in disgust.”

—Thomas Merton, No Man Is an Island

Sit, breath, release, Let Go Let God…Kyrie Elieson.

Guest Blog -Lebanese of Waterville Maine

By Larry Grard
WATERVILLE – Upwards of 75 people packed the Redington Museum parlor on the evening of Thursday, Jan. 10, for a presentation of Waterville’s vibrant Lebanese history, sponsored by the Waterville Historical Society.
Tom Nale and Joe Jabar, both of whom have deep roots in the city’s Lebanese history, provided informative and intriguing half-hour talks.
“What a great turnout on a lovely day,” Historical Society President said, a light-hearted remark considering the frigid temperatures outside. “We have two pillars of the community, both members of the bench, here for us.”
On Feb. 13 at 5:30 p.m., the cultural series will continue with a lecture on Franco-American Women in Waterville. There is no admission charge.
Nale spoke first on Jan. 10, detailing how his Sittoo (grandmother in Arabic) and Giddoo (grandfather), and many other Lebanese immigrants, endured the trip to the United States in the early part of the 20th century. The famine of 1918 had wiped out half the country’s 800,000 people.
“They were caged with chicken wire in the worst part of the ship with little food,” Nale said. “They sang songs.”
One group of Lebanese immigrants landed first in Canada, and traveled at night by foot to reach Waterville.
The great majority of Waterville Lebanese are Maronite (Eastern Rite) Catholics, and they were quick to organize a Maronite church of their own. The first family, that of Abraham Joseph, had come to Waterville in 1888. Two years laater, Lebanese families were attending Roman Catholic Masses at Sacred Heart and St. Francis. But by 1924, Father Awad came from the old country to establish the first Maronite church in the city. Today, the gorgeous St. Joseph Maronite Catholic C hurch on Front Street faces the Kennebec River, looking east.
The immigrants built tenements along the riverside, in an area known as “Head of Falls.” Those houses were torn down in the late 1960s.
“I can tell you where each and every house was on Head of Falls,” Nale said. “That was because I had a paper route. Me and Joe were altar boys, and we went to the church after our routes. When Joe and I were serving the church was absolutely full from front to back.”
The mills attracted most of the Lebanese, French, Polish and other immigrants to Waterville, but some Lebanese were Phoenicians, who were merchants. Al Corey had his famous music store on Main Street, and the Peter Joseph family only recently sold Joseph’s Market, which is still in business a stone’s throw from the church.
“We were all known as cousins,” Nale said. “To work on the railroad was a dream for those men. It was not hard work.”
Sen. George Mitchell became the city’s most celebrated Lebanese, although for a time his older brother, the late Johnny “Swisher” Mitchell, claimed that mantle. Swisher led undefeated Waterville High to the New England Basketball Championship in 1944.
Jabar referred to the Earl Smith “Water Village,” which explains some of the tenets of the Maronite religion. St. Maron was a monk in the hills of Lebanon.
Jabar’s father was born in Waterville in 1905, making him one of the early first-generation Lebanese. In 1922, George Jabar and Phillip Nagem became the first Lebanese boys to graduate Waterville High.
“He made $17 a week at the mill,” Jabar said of his father. “Then he got $20-$25 as a weaver. He became a union organizer in the 1930s. He was a natural.”
Those first-generation Waterville Lebanese instilled in their children the need for education.
“We had eight siblings in our family,” Jabar said. “Seven of them went to college.”
The Lebanese kids – including Swisher Mitchell – made the Boys Club their second home. Jabar said there is a 16 mm tape available of Waterville’s victory over Somerville, MA, in the New England final.
“Swisher would dribble, dribble, dribble,” said Jabar, who wasn’t a bad athlete himself in the mid-1960s. “He kept the basketball.”
The Redington Museum will be open to the public from Memorial Day week to Labor Day. Hours are 10-11 a.m. and 1-2 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday.

Fasting Maronite Faithful

The Maronite Church was founded by a monk named StMaron and continues to be a tradition based on monastic practices. St Sharbel is our most recent model of a faithful servant. In the Cana Week Monday Safro the First Prayer shows the sacred focus of fasting

“FIRST PRAYER
Lord, have mercy on us and save us.
O God, may we submit to this holy fast
and accept it with all our will, with joy and good cheer; do not make us strangers to the reward given to those who fast.
Walking in the way of penitence and mortification we shall arrive in the eternal kingdom where we shall praise your glory, for ever. Amen.”

So what is the expectation of the faithful during Lent?  The 1736 Synod of Mt. Lebanon states:

“Every weekday of Lent (Monday through Friday) is a day of fasting and abstinence from meat and dairy products (eggs, butter, milk, etc.) Fasting involves eating and drinking nothing at all (except water and medicine) from midnight until noon. The rest of the day normal meals can be taken, but without meat or dairy products. Dairy products are excluded because they are animal byproducts. Saturdays and Sundays are exempt from fasting and abstaining, as are the following four feast days: St. Maron – February 9, The 40 Martyrs – March 9, St. Joseph – March 19 and the Annunciation – March 25.” This is a wonderful goal but not a requirement. The requirement now is fasting on Ash Monday and Good Friday.

I like to use an analogy of tuning a musical instrument.  To be perfect one needs to use a tuning fork. But if you tune by ear it still may sound ok. This is not precise but acceptable with some. The same with these kinds of suggested practices. Following the original 1736 practices is like using a tuning fork to be precise and ultimately closer to the perfection of Creation. But the current practices are OK. Jesus does give us the freedom to choose. The consequences or rewards of those choices are subject to multiple interpretations of the Magesteruim and our prayerful reason, but in the end are a mystery. I would suggest the Magesterium has the wisdom of the ages for the most part. That is the subject of another blog.

Starting Over with George Smith

An editorial article in our local paper by George Smith inspired me to write him a short letter. Rather an email not a letter. We don’t write letters anymore except those who want to use script to send a very kind and personal note to a friend. Anyway Georgia’s article was about starting over. The gist of his article was that we all at times in our life must start over. We reach a point where our mistakes, foibles and tragedies have overcome us and we give up at least for a moment. Then our faith takes over and some of us give up and give in and accept that no one’s perfect and that we must start again from where we know is a perfect beginning. George is an amazing man, for you see he has ALS. And even in the midst of this disease he continues to write and share his thoughts about life, the outdoors, and our great state of Maine. Remarkable, and sad. But his article says it all. For it seems to me that every morning when he wakes up and realizes he has ALS he must start over again understanding accepting living with this tragedy and trying to make lemonade from the lemons life has given him. He seems to have done a great job with this challenge. Thanks George for a great article.